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Partitioning a hard drive

  Date: Feb 06    Category: Unix / Linux / Ubuntu    Views: 418
  

I have an old laptop with a 80GB HD. It was running windows7. I installed
UBUNTU 10.1 and its running fine. However, when I looked the total disk
size, it showed only of 60GB for both Win7 and UBUNTU. I used a partition
manager and discovered that almost 18GB partition is not allocated.

The drive has a small startup partition, a c: partition-Win7, a small-10GB
d: restore partition-Win7, an E: UBUNTU partition, and a unallocated 18GB
partition. I formatted the partition and wanted to merge it with the e:
partition without any success. I am using the Acronis disk director 10, but
it not allows me to merge. All partitions are formatted as primary. I also
tried the unallocated partition as logical, but with the same results. I
would appreciate any help to merge the unallocated 18GB partition with the
e:Ubuntu partition

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13 Answers Found

 
Answer #1    Answered On: Feb 06    

For further clarification, let me ask you to post a copy of your partition table
here. In Ubuntu, start a "Terminal" window, and enter

sudo parted

Enter your password when requested. Then, enter the command "print". Copy &
Paste the results here. Enter the command "quit" to get out of parted.

 
Answer #2    Answered On: Feb 06    

If I were in your shoes, I would format the spare space as FAT32, then
it could be R/W mounted on either Win 7 or Ubuntu.
It would make moving files back and forth between operating systems
super easy. I love Acronis Disk Director and am
surprised that it is not cooperating.

 
Answer #3    Answered On: Feb 06    

I would boot the Live CD and use Gparted or Partition Editor/ Manager
(the name changes with version). You cna either format the unallocated
space in format that you choose or you can Resize if you do not want
an extra partitions. I am a graphical guy so U would just click on the
partition to make larger in the ribbon at the top and right-click and
Choose Resize and make it larger by using all of the space to the
right or left (it may not allow you to get everything, it usually
wastes a few MBs). Check and double check then hit Apply.

You cannot work on a mounted partition so that is why you use the Live CD.

 
Answer #4    Answered On: Feb 06    

Does this mean I can resize my home partition in Kdenlive without loosing all my
stuff?

 
Answer #5    Answered On: Feb 06    

Yes and No. Mess with hardware manipulation only after you have done a
backup or "risk loosing" some or all your data.

 
Answer #6    Answered On: Feb 06    


You are only allowed to have four primary or extended partitions on a drive, and
that's what you have. However, using Gparted to expand the fourth partition
should work.

My laptop has two primary partitions, and an extended partition containing six
logical partitions. To match this kind of setup, you would lose all your data,
so you would need to park it elsewhere then copy is back.

 
Answer #7    Answered On: Feb 06    


You are only allowed to have four primary or extended partitions on a drive, and
that's what you have. However, using Gparted to expand the fourth partition
should work, as Roy described.

My laptop has two primary partitions, and an extended partition containing six
logical partitions. To match this kind of setup, you would lose all your data,
so you would need to park it elsewhere then copy is back.

 
Answer #8    Answered On: Feb 06    

You are only allowed (4) primary partitions. The "and" does not apply.

One of my beefs is manufactures that use up that allotment i.e. windows
recovery, windows, special manufacturer tools, and I think backup,
without placing some of this in an extended partition. Extended
partitions can be used for more partitions, I have put more than 4
partitions on an extended partition, this makes more than eight total.

Only way to add partitions is with labels, without them it is
unmanageable so be sure to label your partitions.

 
Answer #9    Answered On: Feb 06    

I share your beef. I resent Windows at all but when OEMs don't provide
disks and instead occupy valuable real estate it is annoying. It may seem
like a trifle in terms of disk space but it is not if you need to worry
about the NUMBER of partitions --- and I do. I like to test distros and
that means lots of partitions. Ubuntu occupies two plus the swap and
Windows two, that makes five. You need to know about extended and logical
partitions even to get your feet wet. You need to be a guru to do much
beyond testing one or two. I never wanted to know about many things, but it
is learn or not be able to do what you want. I don't like roadblocks and
resent unnecessary ones.

 
Answer #10    Answered On: Feb 06    

I was under the impression it was 4 primary partitions 'per hard
drive'. So two drives should give you up to 8 primary ?

R> I like to test distros and that means lots of partitions.

 
Answer #11    Answered On: Feb 06    

This is for BIOS based computers:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk_partitioning
Extended partition

A hard disk may contain only one extended partition; the extended partition
can be subdivided into multiple *logical partitions*. In DOS/Windows
systems, each logical partition may then be assigned an additional drive
letter.

www.pcguide.com/.../structPartitions-c.html
One of the four partitions may be designated as an *extended DOS partition*.
This partition may then be subdivided into multiple *logical partitions*.
This is the way that two or more logical DOS volumes can be placed on a
single hard disk.

UEFI based computers can have up to 128 primary partitions.

This is for my IDE and SATA drives. I am not sure about SCSI or HFS, etc.
You can have any number of logical partitions. I have seven or eight at a
time. But it gets complicated once you get to 23 logical partitions in
terms of naming them. It is beyond my skill.

If there is an easy way to squeeze more in then let me know. :)

 
Answer #12    Answered On: Feb 06    

I can't figure out what you meant by "the and does not apply."

HP is infamous for consuming all four partitions: boot, Windows, Windows
Recovery, HP Tools. I got an article for Full Circle Magazine out of how I
overcame this on my G62 laptop.

I have not labelled my partitions, but it's a good idea.

 
Answer #13    Answered On: Feb 06    

the "and" was in response to 4 primary and extended partitions.
(only 4 primary partitions) You may have many partitions in an extended
partition this exceeds the 4 primary and extended partitions stated in
the post I responded to.

I should take more time to read my posts. Sorry again.

 
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